The topic I'd like to see represented in a keynote at ISTE 2010 is...

Why Has Technology Affected So Little Change on Teaching and Learning?

Despite the millions (billions?) of dollars spent on instructional technology over the past decade, most classrooms look and work very much the same as they did 50 years ago. Why? What did we do wrong? What can we do to make it right?

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    tstahmertstahmer shared this idea  ·   ·  Admin →

    5 comments

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      • TechnoliteracyTechnoliteracy commented  · 

        I think that the way that this is assessed and evaluated is the key. Yes, there are a number of educators unwilling to take the extra steps to make the technology in schools successful, however. Have we yet defined what "successful" looks like?

      • nstrehlownstrehlow commented  · 

        David Thornburg has been talking about this for decades.

      • Cameron ClarkCameron Clark commented  · 

        Most teachers are teaching as if we were in the 1900's with only a few modifications to their daily routine. Yet the students are the most wired generation ever.
        So students are powered down at school and fully wired at home. We have to break this impasse else our education
        will founder and neither Australia or the USA will become "Smart Nations".

      • Jeff BolkanJeff Bolkan commented  · 

        Great topic! I can think of a few professors that could address this, but not sure any of my suggestions would have the name recognition needed. One of the problems I see is a bit of the chicken-egg question. We all tend to emulate our role models and teachers are no exception. Even those who've gone through great schools of education will have spent most of their college experience in "old school" classrooms--very few will have had project-based technology-infused experiences earlier either.

        Being told that there is a better way to teach and learn isn't as effective as being shown. Simply giving teachers technology doesn't automatically lead to them abandoning the paradigm that they were immersed in virtually their entire life.

      • bionicteachingbionicteaching commented  · 

        Good point, although I have no idea who they'd get to do that keynote. Maybe Alfie Kohn?

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